Bonnie Prince Charlie’s Favourite Snake by Bill Shannon

The year was 1745 and the Young Pretender, Bonnie Prince Charlie, was on the run from the English army after his defeat at Culloden. He was hiding amongst the remote glens and wild hills of the far West of Scotland when he sat down on the ruined wall of an ancient blackhouse to have a spot of lunch. Unbeknown to the Prince, an adder was also occupying the old dyke, asleep in the sun  and was not best pleased when the prince sat down on top of him. The adder’s first instinct was to bite  Charlie, which would have been most unfortunate since the prince, like any true Highlander, wasn’t wearing anything under his kilt. But the adder had Jacobite sympathies and resisted the temptation to sink his fangs into the fragrant rump of the Young Pretender. The Prince tried to thank the adder for his forbearance, uttering “Merci beaucoup, tu est mon serpent favori” or words to that effect, but the snake did not speak French and hadn’t a clue what his Royal friend was saying. Flora Macdonald, who was there among the Prince’s motley crew of supporters, explained to the snake that the prince was saying thanks and that he was  now Charlie’s favourite snake – “By Royal Appointment”  – so to speak. Then the prince went on to say…”Je suis comme le roi d’un pays pluvieux” which again left the snake a bit bewildered. The loyal Flora wasn’t much help either and said to the snake that she didn’t know what the bonny prince was  on about. “I dinner ken,” she added, “and in any case how am I supposed to know since the man  who wrote these words  has not been born yet?” The Prince then stood up and made to set off  on his way. “Robert The Bruce  has got his spider”, he shouted, “And now I’ve gone one better with my very own snake.’  With that he vanished into the damp mists, bogs and waste-high heather of the far West.
This then, in industrial strength wood and metal filler. epoxy resin, acrylic paint and hundreds of individually hand-cut rusty fence staples, is my tribute to that most forbearing of  snakes.

Measures 70 cm wide by 59 cm deep in its frame (weighs a tonne).

 

 

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Winter Morning by Pat Semple (1994)

A small abstract landscape entitled “Winter Morning” by the Ross-shire-based contemporary artist Pat Semple.  Signed lower left and in good condition  in its original frame.  This work bears a label, verso, indicating that it was exhibited in 1994 at the Scottish  Gallery in Edinburgh in  a joint show by Semple and her late  husband, the artist and teacher Derek Clarke, entitled “Two Artists – One Place”.

Measures 18 cm wide by 15 cm deep (31 cm by 25 cm in its frame).

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